Viking Runes Through Time

Part of Sweden’s famous runestone, which bears the longest-known runic inscription in stone.© Ella Hanochi/iStockphoto BY NICOLE SANDERSON TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2000 NOVA The Vikings are often portrayed as illiterate, uncultured barbarians who evinced more interest in plunder than in poetry. In fact, the Vikings left behind a great number of documents in stone, wood,Continue reading “Viking Runes Through Time”

Viking Social Structure Class Systems and the Norse in Scandinavia and Beyond

By K. Kris Hirst Updated February 05, 2020 Viking social structure was highly stratified, with three ranks or classes which were written directly into Scandinavian mythology, as slaves (called thrall in Old Norse), farmers or peasants (karl), and the aristocracy (jarl or earl). Mobility was theoretically possible across the three strata—but in general, slaves were an exchangeContinue reading “Viking Social Structure Class Systems and the Norse in Scandinavia and Beyond”

The Stunning Viking Runestones Of Scandinavia

David Nikel Senior Contributor @Forbes The recent discovery of several Viking ship graves in Norway has lifted interest in Viking history to new heights. While there’s no doubting the fascinating discoveries being made, some truly remarkable Viking artifacts exist in plain sight throughout Scandinavia: runestones. The region’s tradition of carving inscriptions into raised stones as a memorialContinue reading “The Stunning Viking Runestones Of Scandinavia”

Fantastically Preserved Viking Boat Grave and Skeletons Unearthed in Sweden

By Yasemin Saplakoglu July 08, 2019 Archaeologists recently unearthed two Viking burial boats in Uppsala, Sweden — one of which was exceptionally preserved and held the remains of a dog, a man and a horse. The Vikings sent a handful of their powerful elites to the afterlife in boats laden with sacrificed animals, weapons and treasure; the funeralContinue reading “Fantastically Preserved Viking Boat Grave and Skeletons Unearthed in Sweden”

Beads Found in 3,400-year-old Nordic Graves Were Made by King Tut’s Glassmaker

Philippe Bohstrom Posted on haaretz.com, Mar 09, 2016 10:29 PM Cobalt glass beads found in Scandinavian Bronze Age tombs reveal trade connections between Egyptians and Mesopotamia 3,400 years ago — and similar religious rituals. Stunning glass beads found in Danish Bronze Age burials dating to 3400 years ago turn out to have come from ancientContinue reading “Beads Found in 3,400-year-old Nordic Graves Were Made by King Tut’s Glassmaker”

A Viking Mystery Beneath Oxford University, archaeologists have uncovered a medieval city that altered the course of English history

Written by: David Keys in SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2010 Before construction could begin on new student housing at one of Oxford University’s 38 colleges, St. John’s, archaeologists were summoned to investigate the site in January 2008. After just a few hours of digging, one archaeologist discovered the remains of a 4,000-year-old religious complex—an earthworkContinue reading “A Viking Mystery Beneath Oxford University, archaeologists have uncovered a medieval city that altered the course of English history”